Keeping Sane Through Books

Books to the ceiling,
Books to the sky,
My pile of books is a mile high.
How I love them! How I need them!
I'll have a long beard by the time I read them.
-Arnold Lobel

Jun 4, 2009 3:03pm
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
I read both this and The Soloist while visiting my friend in Missouri. While he was at work the three of us there would just read. I guess this book goes with my reading of books that are currently becoming movies.
I really like Jodi Picoult’s writing, she’s very captive and I’ve enjoyed everything I’ve read by her so far. I get through her books fast because they’re hard to put down.
But, while I loved this book my final note is that I hated the ending. I understand why Jodi Picoult’s son didn’t talk to her for weeks after he read the book.
Up Next: Sybil by Flora Rheta Schreiber

My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult

I read both this and The Soloist while visiting my friend in Missouri. While he was at work the three of us there would just read. I guess this book goes with my reading of books that are currently becoming movies.

I really like Jodi Picoult’s writing, she’s very captive and I’ve enjoyed everything I’ve read by her so far. I get through her books fast because they’re hard to put down.

But, while I loved this book my final note is that I hated the ending. I understand why Jodi Picoult’s son didn’t talk to her for weeks after he read the book.

Up Next: Sybil by Flora Rheta Schreiber

Jun 4, 2009 2:59pm
The Soloist by Steve Lopez
I was with a friend and mentioned that I really wanted to see the movie The Soloist when they said they really wanted to read the book first. Needless to say, I felt stupid that I didn’t know it was a book. But I’m so glad I found out.
Maybe the musician in me makes me biased for why I love this book so much but past all the wonderful musical reference and a plethora of new classical music I want to check out now, it’s really an inspiring story. It also bring up interesting questions about how much humans are responsible for one another and has a lot of psychology information that took me back to junior ear when I took AP Psych.
This may be my favorite book from the tumblr so far. Probably up there with The Perks of Being a Wallflower.

The Soloist by Steve Lopez

I was with a friend and mentioned that I really wanted to see the movie The Soloist when they said they really wanted to read the book first. Needless to say, I felt stupid that I didn’t know it was a book. But I’m so glad I found out.

Maybe the musician in me makes me biased for why I love this book so much but past all the wonderful musical reference and a plethora of new classical music I want to check out now, it’s really an inspiring story. It also bring up interesting questions about how much humans are responsible for one another and has a lot of psychology information that took me back to junior ear when I took AP Psych.

This may be my favorite book from the tumblr so far. Probably up there with The Perks of Being a Wallflower.

May 27, 2009 10:05am

Up Next: The Soloist

by Steve Lopez

May 27, 2009 10:04am
Just up the hill, Disney Hall is a great landed ship with mercury sails, a gleaming hallucination on the skyline. Down here, cars streak through the Second Street tunnel, trucks rumble, sirens blare, and Nathaniel begins to play, slicing through the madness. His eyes are closed, and in his shuttered world there is order, logic, sanity, sweet relief. If only for a while. - Steve Lopez, The Soloist
May 26, 2009 4:24pm
Queen of Babble in the Big City by Meg Cabot
I forgot how much I love Meg Cabot, I finished this book in about two days. She may not be the best writer but she’s a really good storyteller and a great summer read. I can get wrapped up in her books easliy.
This is the second Queen of Babble book and while I don’t remember much of the first one I think this one was better. Now eventually I must read the third one, because there was a cliffhanger at the end that I’m a bit upset about.
So, if you want a great summer read, pick up something by her because it’s a good sit on the beach or poolside (or in your cousin’s kitchen watching her color) and just read book that isn’t hard to get through but still enjoyable.

Queen of Babble in the Big City by Meg Cabot

I forgot how much I love Meg Cabot, I finished this book in about two days. She may not be the best writer but she’s a really good storyteller and a great summer read. I can get wrapped up in her books easliy.

This is the second Queen of Babble book and while I don’t remember much of the first one I think this one was better. Now eventually I must read the third one, because there was a cliffhanger at the end that I’m a bit upset about.

So, if you want a great summer read, pick up something by her because it’s a good sit on the beach or poolside (or in your cousin’s kitchen watching her color) and just read book that isn’t hard to get through but still enjoyable.

May 24, 2009 1:31pm
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
This book made me melancholic…but in a good way I guess. I love books that are written in journals or in letters and Charlie’s anonymous letters brought me into this novel.
It’s hard to describe this book except to say that everybody needs to read it. Either in high school or shortly after. It definitely brought my life into perspective.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

This book made me melancholic…but in a good way I guess. I love books that are written in journals or in letters and Charlie’s anonymous letters brought me into this novel.

It’s hard to describe this book except to say that everybody needs to read it. Either in high school or shortly after. It definitely brought my life into perspective.

May 20, 2009 5:55pm
The Alexandria Link by Steve Berry
I don’t think it’s been said here but I’m a bit of a history buff. More like a history lover (because I think the term history buff makes me sound like Garrett the kid in my high school who learned about nothing but history…and liked to show it off while talking in his really weird voice). Anyway…Berry’s really good at putting together historical links with some action. It’s kind of like what I imagine The Da Vinci Code is like, although I’ve never read it (gasp!).
But as you can deduce from the title, The Alexandria Link is about the lost library of Alexandria which I know little about (I’m more of a European history lover) but it was really interesting. There are a lot of biblical issues brought up revolving around if The Bible is as true as we take it to be. It’s really thought provoking.
The Alexandria Link kept my attention and I really enjoyed reading it and trying to figure out what different clues and such led to. But, if you want to read something by Steve Berry my recommendation still lies with The Romanov Prophecy which was the first book I read by him…but my Russia obsession makes me a little biased there.
Up Next: The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

The Alexandria Link by Steve Berry

I don’t think it’s been said here but I’m a bit of a history buff. More like a history lover (because I think the term history buff makes me sound like Garrett the kid in my high school who learned about nothing but history…and liked to show it off while talking in his really weird voice). Anyway…Berry’s really good at putting together historical links with some action. It’s kind of like what I imagine The Da Vinci Code is like, although I’ve never read it (gasp!).

But as you can deduce from the title, The Alexandria Link is about the lost library of Alexandria which I know little about (I’m more of a European history lover) but it was really interesting. There are a lot of biblical issues brought up revolving around if The Bible is as true as we take it to be. It’s really thought provoking.

The Alexandria Link kept my attention and I really enjoyed reading it and trying to figure out what different clues and such led to. But, if you want to read something by Steve Berry my recommendation still lies with The Romanov Prophecy which was the first book I read by him…but my Russia obsession makes me a little biased there.

Up Next: The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

May 18, 2009 9:57pm
bookshelves:
(via http://heartsbend.tumblr.com)
I so need to colorcode my bookshelves.

bookshelves:

(via http://heartsbend.tumblr.com)

I so need to colorcode my bookshelves.

May 18, 2009 6:14pm
booktumbling:




Shakespeare and Company, on the Left Bank just across the Seine from Notre Dame (37, rue de la Boucherie). This bookstore, often confused with the one founded by Sylvia Beach on 30 Rue de l’Odéon and frequented by Hemingway, opened its doors to booklovers and emerging writers such as Allen Ginsberg and the Beats 30 years later in the ‘50s. However, both sell primarily English-language books. What gives this bookstore its charming characteristic is the “Tumbleweed Hotel” on the second floor. Here, bookworms—nicknamed “tumbleweeds”— are welcome to stay the night on one of the three rather shabby beds for free. The “payment” is to read a book and leave a short autobiography, or help out with some chores, which most gladly do. The permanent residents on these beds are two housecats, who pay little attention to the comings and goings of visitors. On the other end of the second floor, which faces Notre Dame, you will find some wooden benches next to shelves of books, stacked all the way up to the ceiling. Here, you can sit and chat with friends without feeling obliged to purchase anything. Perfect for low-budget travelers who love a good intellectual conversation!

Between this and the Library Hotel in New York I could just have a book vacation…

booktumbling:

Shakespeare & Co by Airchild.

Shakespeare and Company, on the Left Bank just across the Seine from Notre Dame (37, rue de la Boucherie). This bookstore, often confused with the one founded by Sylvia Beach on 30 Rue de l’Odéon and frequented by Hemingway, opened its doors to booklovers and emerging writers such as Allen Ginsberg and the Beats 30 years later in the ‘50s. However, both sell primarily English-language books.

What gives this bookstore its charming characteristic is the “Tumbleweed Hotel” on the second floor.

Here, bookworms—nicknamed “tumbleweeds”— are welcome to stay the night on one of the three rather shabby beds for free. The “payment” is to read a book and leave a short autobiography, or help out with some chores, which most gladly do. The permanent residents on these beds are two housecats, who pay little attention to the comings and goings of visitors.

On the other end of the second floor, which faces Notre Dame, you will find some wooden benches next to shelves of books, stacked all the way up to the ceiling. Here, you can sit and chat with friends without feeling obliged to purchase anything. Perfect for low-budget travelers who love a good intellectual conversation!

Between this and the Library Hotel in New York I could just have a book vacation…

May 17, 2009 1:48pm
There are too many books I haven’t read, too many places I haven’t seen, too many memories I haven’t kept long enough. - Irwin Shaw (via kari-shma) (via quote-book)
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